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The Moroccans who saved my life

At Lalla Fatna Beach in Safi the day before the accident. The waves here were so huge and nasty that I didn’t even try to bodysurf them. Should have made the same decision the next day at Sidi Bouzid.

By Kevin BarrettVeterans Today Editor

Still finding it hard to believe I’m alive.

Three days ago, while I was bodysurfing at Sidi Bouzid beach near El Jadida, Morocco, a freak wave slammed me head first into the sand, rupturing a disc in my neck and leaving me temporarily paralyzed between my waist and chin. I flopped helplessly in the breaking surf for a few minutes that seemed like forever, gasping for air when I could, emitting brief and feeble cries for help, and using my legs to try to shove myself shoreward.

Totally underwater except during the rare moments when the current wave briefly receded, growing ever more bloated with seawater, I thought it likely I would die there…but kept fighting for life in hopes of seeing family and friends again. “Please God somehow save me from this…” Splash. Crash. Roar. Getting tumbled in the surf really sucks when you can’t feel or use your arms.

Fortunately the waves kept nudging me towards shore. Every now and then I could get my lips above the waterline, suck in a lungful of air, and try to scream for help.

The beach was sparsely attended. The water at this time of year is considered cold, and the waves dangerous. Two young Moroccans finally caught sight of me and raced into the surf to pull me out. As they say in Morocco: Alhamdulillah.

The next few hours were a blur. I lay flat on the beach, involuntarily flailing my legs, unable to feel or move my arms but capable of wiggling my fingers, sharp electrical pains jolting from my lower neck through my shoulders and down my arms.

A chattering crowd gathered round me. Eventually the ambulance arrived and they boarded me on a stretcher.

The road to the hospital was bumpy. I convinced the attendant to hold my head so it wouldn’t bounce around too much.

They carried me into Mohammed V Hospital in downtown El Jadida: a Moroccan public hospital where the poor get bare-bones treatment for serious or terminal conditions. (Better off folks including the middle class use private cliniques).

It was definitely not the Mayo Clinic…more like a field hospital from the front lines of the war on poverty. Some of the patients looked to be in pretty bad shape. But the doctor, who spoke perfect unaccented English despite never having visited an English speaking country, was compassionate and competent.

They ran a CT scan. “I have good news for you Mr. Barrett. You have a herniated disk. Recovery prognosis good. But you need an MRI. The only good one in Morocco is in Casablanca. If you stay there you could be seen in a week to ten days.”

I asked if I could travel. They said yes.  I decided to return to the USA as planned and do the MRI there.

They fitted me for a neck brace and discharged me in record time.

I have been spending a couple of days resting up and will fly home soon.

It is now three days after the stupidest body-surfing decision of my not-yet-terminated lifetime. The numbness and electrical pains are receding. I can finally sit up and type, even with the extra-numb left hand.

So there you have it folks: My excuse for not answering emails, failing to post articles and radio shows, and having to miss yet another False Flag Weekly News.

I feel immense gratitude to God (Allah in Arabic), and to those two Moroccan guys who saved my life. I am also grateful for the way so many Moroccans—the ambulance driver and attendants, the doctor and nurses, and the cops and security people who always have to get involved when something happens to a visitor from a rich country—treated me not just with kindness and decency, but genuine friendliness.

Moroccans are good people…maybe the most genuinely hospitable people in the world.

10 Thoughts to “The Moroccans who saved my life”

  1. WOW! Great rescue! Get well soon, Kevin. Safe travels home.

  2. I don’t believe there is such thing as “randomness” or “freak accident”.Everything has been written in the realm of timelessness before it even happens in the realm of time and space.

    Quran [057:22-23] : “NO CALAMITY can ever befall the earth, and nei­ther your own selves, unless it be [laid down] in Our decree before We bring it into being : verily, all this is easy for God. [Know this,] so that you may not despair over whatever [good] has escaped you nor exult [unduly] over whatever [good] has come to you: for, God does not love any of those who, out of self-conceit, act in a boastful manner” (as translated by ‘Mohammad Asad’)

    Maybe in that incident, there was yet another sign or even warning from Allah. That’s for you to decipher its intended message.

  3. Michael Cook

    Super glad to hear you’re still with us- and terribly sorry about your unfortunate luck!!!! Take care and heal fast! <3

  4. Bruce

    Praise His saving name!

  5. “They carried me into Mohammed V Hospital in downtown El Jadida: a Moroccan public hospital where the poor get bare-bones treatment for serious or terminal conditions. (Better off folks including the middle class use private cliniques).

    It was definitely not the Mayo Clinic…more like a field hospital from the front lines of the war on poverty. Some of the patients looked to be in pretty bad shape.”

    Instead of using your energy to look down on the hospital you were taken to (and its patients), worry rather about getting back physically in shape and be grateful for that establishment that you are so adamant on criticizing. Even flirtation with death didn’t seem to have knocked you down off your high horse : your western sense of entitlement is just too embedded in your veins, as is the case with most westerners.

    The situation is similar to that of a hungry beggar asking for food, but when someone gives him some food, he starts criticizing the food.

    When you were struggling with the waves, where were those guys you are sucking up to (David ray griffin,Robert steel,…etc), thinking that your livelihood depends on it ?. There is only Allah on whom you depend, you better do not forget that ever. And whatever blessing Allah decides to help you with at any particular moment, take it, say Alhamdulillah and move on : be it a fancy hospital or a rundown hospital, be it a date and a glass of water or a fancy $300. meal at Maxim’s….etc.

    As for the Mayo clinic, F the mayo clinic : a bunch of FDA approved middle men, between stupid system-worshipping patients and pharma,Inc businesses.

    The “rich” country you mentioned you were from, is actually the poorest on the planet, for it is spiritual poverty that is the real poverty. As the Quran states, the real blindness is the blindness of the heart, not the blindness of the eyes (Quran [022:46]).

    It is time to pause and reflect, brother Kevin. May Allah bless you with wisdom, guidance and turn your “freak” wave experience into an opportunity to climb higher.

  6. Frank

    I could feel your fear. Happy you are ok

  7. Bob Kaufman

    If they took you to the hospital they must be hospitable.
    The advantage of having a freak accident is that it’s extremely unlikely to happen again.
    Be thankful to Allah that you have not become quadriplegic. That’s a life changer for sure.
    Let this be a lesson: Geezers shouldn’t act like teenagers.

  8. Pat in San Francisco

    Wow Kevin; sounds like you really could’ve left us with that event… fortunately Allah agreed with us earth bound Truthers: your work here isn’t done yet! God Speed in your recovery Brother!

  9. Charley

    Kevin! Sorry! Definitely, Good and yeah, Thank God!!

  10. Carol

    OMG Kevin! I am so sorry to hear this. Glad you got saved by some good humans. We need your voice on this side of the veil.
    Listen to your doctors… rest as much as possible. We will be patient.

    Sending much love and healing energy.

    Carol

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